vonChristian Ihle 26.02.2019

Monarchie & Alltag

Neue Bands und wichtige Filme: „As long as the music’s loud enough, we won’t hear the world falling apart“.

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„I quite liked Brutalism when it came out. It wasn’t my kind of music but I liked some of it — it was catchy. And they were nice lads, polite online and stuff. But I thought they were kind of a street band, there were lines like “Tarquin” that would insinuate that they were knocking the middle classes, but it turns out they’re not working class. That offended me, because I then held the belief that they were appropriating, to a certain degree, a working class voice. Obviously that excelled when the second album came out, and I felt a bit cheated. I also became jaded by this idea that we were a band that was campaigning for social justice, when we’re not, we’re just talking about what’s around us. Music can’t solve political problems. And I think their take on it is cliched, patronising, insulting and mediocre. And that’s why I have a problem with them. I take music seriously, and I’ve come from a place where this music has been created. Without that, we wouldn’t be here. I went through a lot of pain – I understand Idles’ singer has gone through a lot of pain. But I don’t believe their slant on this. I don’t like them at all.“

(Sleaford Mods Sänger Jason Williamson im Guardian, via Stereogum)


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https://blogs.taz.de/popblog/2019/02/26/schmaehkritik-672-sleaford-mods-ueber-idles/

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